How to Invest $100 a Month in Stocks for 20 Years?

Nov 09, 2023 By Triston Martin

On the other hand, the answer over the long run is the complete reverse of what you would expect: it is considered riskier to continue putting money away into saves than investing it. Investing in stocks provides at least the potential for financial gain.


In this scenario, being sensible in the near term does not always correspond to being rational in the long run. This encourages investors to put their money into stocks and other equity assets, hoping to outperform inflation, which drives their prices. The one hundred dollars in an investment account will yield a relatively low-interest rate. Over time, it will probably lose value due to inflation; a genuine loss in buying power is nearly guaranteed.


The Power of Compounding


Once you have a firm grasp on the idea of compounding, monthly payments will start to make a lot more sense. The effect of compound returns is comparable to that of a snowball rolling downhill; initially, it is modest and goes slowly, but as time passes, it grows in size and gathers speed.


Time and the reinvestment of previous profits are the two most important components of compound returns. The purchase of stocks results in the payment of dividends, which are then eligible for reinvestment. When carried out over time, this process may serve as a source of growth that feeds on itself. Investing in a way that generates interest at a compound rate consists, at its most fundamental level, of allowing your interest to produce more interest, which, in turn, creates even more interest down the road.


Consider the case of a person who is 30 years old and has $5,000 invested in equity securities producing an annual return of 8% as of January 2020. This return is somewhat lower than the average return on equity investments throughout history, which stands at 10%.


An Illustration Using Monthly Investments of $100


Now let's assume that the same investor who is 30 years old discovers a means to save an extra $100 per month. His investment is still generating 8% annual interest for him. Let's suppose that compounding happens just once a year, in January, to keep things simple.


His portfolio will rise to $186,253.14 over 30 years, owing to compound returns and a tiny monthly payment (compared to $50,313.28 if he did not make the monthly contributions), according to the combination of these two factors. It is important to remember that although $186,253.14 is not enough money to retire on, particularly after 30 years of inflation, this projection is based on just $100 being contributed each month and lower returns than the historical norms.



Why Should Someone Invest in Stocks?


Those still several years away from retiring can consider purchasing equities (such as stocks or mutual funds) as their primary investment vehicle. In the near term, the value of stocks is more likely to decrease than the value of bonds, certificates of deposit (CDs), or money market accounts; yet, it has been shown that stocks provide superior value over the long run compared to any other typical option.


This is particularly true in contexts when interest rates are relatively low. When interest rates are low, the yield on certificates of deposit, bonds, money market accounts, and savings accounts decreases. The purchase of stocks results in the payment of dividends, which are then eligible for reinvestment. This encourages investors to put their money into stocks and other equity assets, hoping to outperform inflation, which drives their prices.


The study went back over 196 years. They discovered that if an individual had begun investing in the year 1810 (the New York Stock Exchange wasn't established until 1817) and placed $10,000 into gold, that person's portfolio would have been worth only $26,000 after accounting for inflation.


Ways to Save One Hundred Dollars Every Month


The first thing you need to do if you want to invest $100 every month is set aside $100 in savings. It is unnecessary to make significant adjustments to one's way of life to minimize expenses since there is a variety of straightforward, actionable advice available.


When looking for things in large quantities, it is recommended that one travel to warehouse shops such as Costco or Sam's Club to make their purchases. Because individual items cost less when purchased in larger quantities, you may save money by going to Costco monthly rather than the supermarket three or four times. This is certainly a better place to start if you do a lot of eating out or if you purchase your lunch every day.


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