Minimum Requirements For Car Insurance By State

Jan 18, 2024 By Susan Kelly

Drivers inside the United States are required by law to carry auto insurance, minimum car insurance requirements by state varying from state to state. The goal of these regulations is to make drivers hold themselves financially accountable for any harm they create on the road. An uninsured motorist risks severe financial hardship and maybe legal repercussions in the event of a collision. Liability insurance, which pays for harm your car does to another person or their property, is usually required by law. This coverage is a legal requirement in every single one, though the minimum types and quantities of coverage mandated by each state may differ. Personal injury protection (PIP) is mandatory in a few jurisdictions. It pays for the policyholder's and their passengers' medical bills and lost wages if they are injured in an accident, regardless of who is at fault.

Some states mandate PIP plus uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage to protect drivers from those who cause accidents but don't carry insurance or don't have enough coverage. Some states have more stringent minimum coverage requirements for auto insurance than others do. To give just one example, the minimum medical malpractice liability coverage required by some states is $50,000 per person as well as $100,000 per accident. In contrast, the minimum required by others is only $25,000.

To guarantee proper coverage and prevent legal complications, drivers should familiarize themselves with the minimum standards in their state. If you don't have the bare minimum in auto insurance, you risk losing your license and paying steep fines. Ultimately, all drivers should familiarize themselves with every state's minimum vehicle insurance requirements to ensure they are properly covered and in line with the law. If drivers are concerned about protecting themselves and their vehicles, they should look into getting additional coverage beyond what is required, like collision or comprehensive coverage.

Minimum Auto Insurance Coverage Requirements By State

Alabama

Liability for bodily harm is capped at $25,000 per injured person and $50,000 total.

Maximum Per-Accident Liability for Property Damage is $25,000.

Alaska

Liability for bodily harm: $50,000 per injured person and $100,000 total

The limit of Responsibility for Property Damage is $25,000 per Incident

Arizona

Liability for bodily harm is capped at $25,000 per injured individual and $50,000 in total.

The limit of Responsibility for Property Damage is $15,000 per Incident.

Arkansas

Legal Limits on Responsibility for Bodily Injury are $25,000 per injured person as well as $50,000 per accident.

$25,000 maximum per Incident for property damage liability

California

Liability for bodily harm is limited to $30,000 or $15,000.

Insurance Coverage Limit per Incident: $5,000 Property Damage Limit

Colorado

Legal Limits on Responsibility for Bodily Injury are $25,000 per injured person as well as $50,000 per accident.

The limit of Responsibility for Property Damage is $15,000 per Incident.

Connecticut

Legal Limits on Responsibility for Bodily Injury are $25,000 per injured person as well as $50,000 per accident.

$25,000 maximum per Incident for property damage liability

Delaware

Legal Limits on Responsibility for Bodily Injury are $25,000 per injured person as well as $50,000 per accident.

Ten Thousand Dollars per Incident for Property Damage

Florida

$10,000 in PIP (Personal Injury Protection)

The maximum amount of money you can be held responsible for in case of an accident is $10,000.

Georgia

Legal Limits on Responsibility for Bodily Injury are $25,000 per injured person as well as $50,000 per accident.

$25,000 maximum per Incident for property damage liability

Hawaii

Maximum Liability for Bodily Injury is $40,000 in a single incident, or $20,000.

Anyone responsible for any damage done to property in an accident will have to pay no more than $10,000.

Idaho

Legal Limits on Responsibility for Bodily Injury are $25,000 per injured person but instead $50,000 per accident.

The limit of Responsibility for Property Damage is $15,000 per Incident.

Illinois

Legal Limits on Responsibility for Bodily Injury are $25,000 per injured person but also $50,000 per accident.

The limit of Responsibility for Property Damage is $20,000 per Incident.

Indiana

Legal Limits on Responsibility for Bodily Injury are $25,000 per injured person as well as $50,000 per accident.

$25,000 maximum per Incident for property damage liability

Iowa

Liability for bodily harm is capped at $20,000 per injured person and $40,000 in total.

The limit of Responsibility for Property Damage is $15,000 per Incident.

Kansas

Legal Limits on Responsibility for Bodily Injury are $25,000 per injured person as well as $50,000 per accident.

$25,000 maximum per Incident for property damage liability

Kentucky

Legal Limits on Responsibility for Bodily Injury are $25,000 per injured person but instead $50,000 per accident.

$25,000 maximum per Incident for property damage liability

Louisiana

Liability for bodily harm is limited to $30,000 or $15,000.

$25,000 maximum per Incident for property damage liability

Maine

Liability for bodily harm: $50,000 per injured person and $100,000 total

$25,000 maximum per Incident for property damage liability

Maryland

The maximum amount of money that can be sued for bodily harm is $30,000 per victim and $60,000 in total damages.

The per-incident property damage liability is $15.

Conclusion

In sum, state-mandated minimum auto insurance coverage helps guarantee drivers will pay their fair share if an accident occurs. Bodily injury liability and the destruction of property liability coverage are usual minimums, with optional extras like PIP and uninsured/underinsured motorist protection also possible. Drivers should be familiar with the legal minimums in their state and should consider getting additional coverage if they feel it is necessary. Having sufficient automobile insurance coverage is crucial for safeguarding oneself or anyone else on the road as well as avoiding legal complications.

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